Army wife. Atheist - Born OK the first time. Psychologist. Liberal. Pro-choice. Southern.

My husband, M, just returned from yet another deployment.

For some reason, the public thinks that the military is full of uber religious super right-winged people. Here are my honest thoughts about being married to a Soldier while being an independent liberal educated female Atheist.

You can follow me on Twitter if you want to @ArmywifeSara

18th April 2014

Post reblogged from Every child wanted; Every mother willing with 411,257 notes

lesbianships:

sonianeverland:

barbiefett:

azurite-crystals:

So lemme get this straight

Robin Thicke

image

this is ok and sexy and fun haha

Justin Timberlake

image

This is ok and artsy and oh wow how modern

Miley Cyrus

image

THIS IS OBSCENE WHAT A SLUT I CANNOT BELIEVE THIS IS WHAT SHES DOING THIS IS MADDNESS HOW DARE SHE WHAT A SLUT WHAT DOES HER FATHER THINK I AM GOING TO FAINT

Is this correct?

reblogging a gain

Because naked women have to be under a man’s control or else they’re dangerous and scary

image

Source: crystvl

18th April 2014

Post reblogged from scarlette rae with 363 notes

scarletterae:

mr-smarter-than-you:

vegantine:

Not everything is about men, SO sorry I don’t want to include them in a movement meant to help women who are constantly put under men even in their own fucking movement

The world is run by men. Men are superior to you. In an ideal world, women would be the silent property of men. So sit down and shut up, woman.

Awe yay guys a troll

Don’t fret. By the look of his feed, he’s more than likely a 15 yr old boy who has never even seen a woman naked IRL.

Source: vegantine

14th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Tastefully Offensive on Tumblr with 60,517 notes

chrystallene:

theunbeliever:

I set up a cheap rig for watching Netflix and such in the shower.

This is our future.


Army wives shower like this during deployments anyway. May as well watch some House of Cards.

chrystallene:

theunbeliever:

I set up a cheap rig for watching Netflix and such in the shower.

This is our future.

Army wives shower like this during deployments anyway. May as well watch some House of Cards.

Source: imglolz

9th April 2014

Chat reblogged from I'd rather be in the Shire with 259,875 notes

How rape trials should go?

  • Lawyer: Did he rape her?
  • Witness: Yes, but she was drunk and passed out.
  • Lawyer: That's not what I asked. Did he rape her?
  • Witness: Yes, but she was wearin-
  • Lawyer: I didn't ask what she was wearing. Did he rape her?
  • Witness: Yes, but-
  • Lawyer: I didn't ask anything else. It's just a simple yes or no answer. Did he rape her?
  • Witness: Yes.
  • Laywer: Yes, he raped her.
  • Rape is rape is rape, no matter the context.

Source: thefourteenthdoctor

8th April 2014

Post reblogged from Every child wanted; Every mother willing with 154,305 notes

fairytrainer:

b-i-l-l-y-m-a-y-s:

fairytrainer:

i really hate hearing “ew anal sex is gross! shit comes out of there!” because let’s quickly go over what comes out of a vagina:

  1. blood
  2. babies

3. urine

how did the human race survive with men in charge of everything for so long if they don’t even understand that vaginas don’t pee

Source: fairytrainer

7th April 2014

Post reblogged from Science is a candle in the dark with 116,484 notes

deanprincesster:

carryontoabetterplaceabettertime:

deanprincesster:

the catholic church gives wine to 7 year olds but gay marriage is wrong

I mean this is totally out of context but is technically true. It is believed to be the blood of god and they are only given 1 tiny sip once a week but otherwise this is totally correct.

the catholic church encourages 7 year olds to drink blood every week but gay marriage is wrong

Alcohol or symbolic blood - can’t win this one.

Source: deanprincesster

6th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Mr. Doe's Your Religion Is Fucked Up with 68 notes

anonymousatheist420:

Via https://www.facebook.com/atheismpage

anonymousatheist420:

Via https://www.facebook.com/atheismpage

6th April 2014

Post reblogged from Nutbar with 76,997 notes

imnotamisandristbut:

Ok I am not a misandrist or anything, but I would never vote for a male running for president. Everyone knows their jobs are fixing cars and sinks, it just wouldn’t be plausible to think they could make the decisions for the country. And if they’re spending all their time trying to be politicians then who is gonna mow the lawns and move heavy things? I’m not belittling them, those jobs are important too but things work because everyone has their place!

Source: imnotamisandristbut

5th April 2014

Photo reblogged from The Ramblings of a Recondite Australian with 361,204 notes

ugh-l-y:


letourfatewritethewords:

weary—soul:

this was too fucking amazing to not reblog, so I made it black and white.


yes

ugh-l-y:

letourfatewritethewords:

weary—soul:

this was too fucking amazing to not reblog, so I made it black and white.

yes

5th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Dark and crazy Musings with 77 notes

dark-and-crazy-musings:

proud-atheist:

Because not having religion makes you a raging psychopath.http://proud-atheist.tumblr.com

Sunday  derived sometime before 1250 from sunedai, which itself developed from Old English (before 700) Sunnandæg (literally meaning “sun's day”), which is cognate to other Germanic languages, including Old Frisian sunnandei, Old Saxon sunnundag, Middle Dutch sonnendach (modern Dutch zondag), Old High German sunnun tag (modern German Sonntag), and Old Norse sunnudagr (Danish and Norwegian søndag, Icelandic sunnudagur and Swedish söndag). The Germanic term is a Germanic interpretation of Latin dies Solis ("day of the sun", from Sol Invictus, the sun god), which is a translation of the Ancient Greek heméra helíou.[2] The p-Celtic Welsh language also translates the Latin “day of the sun” as dydd Sul. Monday derived sometime before 1200 from monedæi, which itself developed from Old English (around 1000) mōnandæg and mōndæg (literally meaning “moon's day”), which is cognate to other Germanic languages, including Old Frisian mōnadeig, Middle Low German and Middle Dutch mānendag, mānendach (modern Dutch Maandag), Old High German mānetag (modern German Montag), and Old Norse mánadagr (Swedish and Norwegian nynorsk måndag, Icelandic mánudagur. Danish and Norwegian bokmål mandag). The Germanic term is a Germanic interpretation of Latin lunae dies ("day of the moon", from Luna, the moon goddess).Tuesday is derived from Old English Tiwesdæg and Middle English Tewesday, meaning “Tīw’s Day”, the day of Tiw or Týr, the god of single combat, victory and heroic glory in Norse mythology. Tiw was equated with Mars in the interpretatio romana, and the name of the day is a translation of Latin dies Martis "day of Mars", the Roman god of war and guardian of agriculture.Wednesday is derived from Old English Wōdnesdæg and Middle English Wednesdei, “day of Wodanaz”, ultimately a calque of dies Mercurii "day of Mercury” - the Roman god of financial gain, commerce, eloquence (and thus poetry), messages/communication (including divination), travelers, boundaries, luck, trickery and thieves; who is also saiid to be the guide of souls to the underworld. His name is possibly related to the Latin word merx (“merchandise”; compare merchant, commerce, etc.), mercari (to trade), and merces (wages).Thursday is derived from Old English Þūnresdæg and Middle English Thuresday, which means “Thor's day”. Thunor, Donar (German, Donnerstag) and Thor are derived from the Proto-Germanic god Thunraz, god of thunder. In most Romance languages, the day is named after the Roman god of sky and thunder, Jupiter. In Latin, the day was known as Iovis Dies, "Jupiter’s Day". In Latin, the genitive or possessive case of Jupiter was Iovis/Jovis and thus in most Romance languages it became the word for Thursday: Italian giovedì, Spanish jueves, French jeudi, Sardinian jòvia, Catalan dijous, and Romanian joi. This is also reflected in the p-Celtic Welsh dydd Iau. Friday comes from the Old English Frīġedæġ, meaning the “day of Frigg”, a result of an old convention associating the Old English goddess Frigg with the Roman goddess Venus, with whom the day is associated in many different cultures. The same holds for Frīatag in Old High German, Freitag in Modern German and vrijdag in Dutch. The word for Friday in most Romance languages is derived from Latin dies Veneris or “day of Venus" (a translation of Greek Aphrodites hemera) such as vendredi in French, venerdì in Italian, viernes in Spanish, divendres in Catalan, vennari in Corsican, and vineri in Romanian. This is also reflected in the p-Celtic Welsh language as dydd Gwener. Saturday was named dies Saturni ("Saturn’s Day") by the Romans no later than the 2nd century - for the planet Saturn, which controlled the first hour of that day. When the day’s name was introduced into English and other Germanic languages, however, the name was selected as a calque of the god Saturn, after whom the planet was named. The name was introduced into English no later than the tenth century, when the day was referred to as “Sæternes dæge” in an Old English translation of Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People. Prior to that, the old English name was sunnanæfen (“sun” + “eve”).
So the names of the weekdays have nothing to do with the Biblical god, but actually are named after Roman gods or their Nordic counterparts - and via their names, after celestial objects we know as: Sun, Moon, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, and Saturn.

dark-and-crazy-musings:

proud-atheist:

Because not having religion makes you a raging psychopath.
http://proud-atheist.tumblr.com

Sunday  derived sometime before 1250 from sunedai, which itself developed from Old English (before 700) Sunnandæg (literally meaning “sun's day”), which is cognate to other Germanic languages, including Old Frisian sunnandei, Old Saxon sunnundag, Middle Dutch sonnendach (modern Dutch zondag), Old High German sunnun tag (modern German Sonntag), and Old Norse sunnudagr (Danish and Norwegian søndag, Icelandic sunnudagur and Swedish söndag). The Germanic term is a Germanic interpretation of Latin dies Solis ("day of the sun", from Sol Invictus, the sun god), which is a translation of the Ancient Greek heméra helíou.[2] The p-Celtic Welsh language also translates the Latin “day of the sun” as dydd Sul.
Monday derived sometime before 1200 from monedæi, which itself developed from Old English (around 1000) mōnandæg and mōndæg (literally meaning “moon's day”), which is cognate to other Germanic languages, including Old Frisian mōnadeig, Middle Low German and Middle Dutch mānendag, mānendach (modern Dutch Maandag), Old High German mānetag (modern German Montag), and Old Norse mánadagr (Swedish and Norwegian nynorsk måndag, Icelandic mánudagur. Danish and Norwegian bokmål mandag). The Germanic term is a Germanic interpretation of Latin lunae dies ("day of the moon", from Luna, the moon goddess).
Tuesday is derived from Old English Tiwesdæg and Middle English Tewesday, meaning “Tīw’s Day”, the day of Tiw or Týr, the god of single combat, victory and heroic glory in Norse mythology. Tiw was equated with Mars in the interpretatio romana, and the name of the day is a translation of Latin dies Martis "day of Mars", the Roman god of war and guardian of agriculture.
Wednesday is derived from Old English Wōdnesdæg and Middle English Wednesdei, “day of Wodanaz”, ultimately a calque of dies Mercurii "day of Mercury - the Roman god of financial gain, commerce, eloquence (and thus poetry), messages/communication (including divination), travelers, boundaries, luck, trickery and thieves; who is also saiid to be the guide of souls to the underworld. His name is possibly related to the Latin word merx (“merchandise”; compare merchant, commerce, etc.), mercari (to trade), and merces (wages).
Thursday is derived from Old English Þūnresdæg and Middle English Thuresday, which means “Thor's day”. Thunor, Donar (German, Donnerstag) and Thor are derived from the Proto-Germanic god Thunraz, god of thunder. In most Romance languages, the day is named after the Roman god of sky and thunder, Jupiter. In Latin, the day was known as Iovis Dies, "Jupiter’s Day". In Latin, the genitive or possessive case of Jupiter was Iovis/Jovis and thus in most Romance languages it became the word for Thursday: Italian giovedì, Spanish jueves, French jeudi, Sardinian jòvia, Catalan dijous, and Romanian joi. This is also reflected in the p-Celtic Welsh dydd Iau.
Friday comes from the Old English Frīġedæġ, meaning the “day of Frigg”, a result of an old convention associating the Old English goddess Frigg with the Roman goddess Venus, with whom the day is associated in many different cultures. The same holds for Frīatag in Old High German, Freitag in Modern German and vrijdag in Dutch. The word for Friday in most Romance languages is derived from Latin dies Veneris or “day of Venus" (a translation of Greek Aphrodites hemera) such as vendredi in French, venerdì in Italian, viernes in Spanish, divendres in Catalan, vennari in Corsican, and vineri in Romanian. This is also reflected in the p-Celtic Welsh language as dydd Gwener.
Saturday was named dies Saturni ("Saturn’s Day") by the Romans no later than the 2nd century - for the planet Saturn, which controlled the first hour of that day. When the day’s name was introduced into English and other Germanic languages, however, the name was selected as a calque of the god Saturn, after whom the planet was named. The name was introduced into English no later than the tenth century, when the day was referred to as “Sæternes dæge” in an Old English translation of Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People. Prior to that, the old English name was sunnanæfen (“sun” + “eve”).

So the names of the weekdays have nothing to do with the Biblical god, but actually are named after Roman gods or their Nordic counterparts - and via their names, after celestial objects we know as: Sun, Moon, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Venus, and Saturn.

Source: proud-atheist